Drums Of Autumn by Diana Gabaldon

This is the fourth book in the Outlander series by Diana Gabaldon. And while I loved the first three this one dragged throughout most of the first half. Then we get some great action, and then it slowly fizzles out again. I don't know, maybe it's because I don't care for Brianna that much. But her story is just not as compelling as Claires. I felt like she was getting in the way some of the time. The characters pretty much stay the same from the third book, there are a few more, but noting exciting really happens. It didn't keep me glued to the book like the others did. I still read it pretty quickly, but I think that was because I kept hoping something will happen. Also Roger is really bugging me. He's like a fish out of water, just doesn't seem to fit into the story. When I first met Roger I never expected to dislike him that much. Hopefully he redeems himself in the next books.

So the story goes like this. Claire and Jamie end up in the colonies after their adventurous voyage, here they try to start a new life, while Brianna is left in Boston all alone. And while all alone she keeps searching for her parents wanting to find out if they are still alive, if Claire has made it back to Jamie. She ends up stumbling on some information that sends her back to the stone circle, in the effort to try to change history she meets dangers and heartbreaking events that alter her own life forever. Overall the book wasn't bad, I guess you can't put that many events into a persons life before it really becomes fake. And I guess that's what Diana was trying to achieve, just to show us the normal day to day life of Jamie and Claire. Nothing special. Still good though, and I will recommend it if you read the previous ones. 

The Secret Life of Bees by Sue Monk Kidd

This book was great, I read it in two days, it really holds your interest throughout the whole book. The story is about a young girl Lily Owens whose father T. Ray (what she calls him) is abusive and neglectful. She has never heard him say he loved her, or anything that resembled feelings. Unless they were anger, he would punish her by having her kneel on grits. Her mother died in a "gun accident" when Lily was only four years old. Leaving her with her father and nanny/housekeeper Rosaleen, who in part is a stand in for her mother. But when Rosaleen gets arrested for insulting three racists, Lily decides this would be a good time to leave to Tiburon, South Carolina, a town she believes to be connected to her mother. She and Rosaleen find refuge with three beekeeping sisters, who in turn introduce Lily to a mesmerizing life of bees, honey and black Madonnas. This story is all about female empowerment, love and forgiveness.

This story will definitely have an effect on anyone who reads it. It teaches powerful lessons, especially to young girls who are struggling with a hard life. Sue Monk Kidd did a great job capturing every detail of the Pink House, Lily's life as well as all the other characters, I kept thinking that this is a memoir, but even though it's not, it still feels real.

I gave this book three stars, but I can definitely see why it deserves five. This is just not my favorite style of reading, but it's still great, and everyone should read it. I wonder is they read this book in schools.

And I just found out there's a movie. How great is that. After I watch it I'll post my review of that also.