The Husbands Secret by Liane Moriarty

What would you do if you discovered a secret about your husband that would ruin your whole life?
At the heart of The Husband’s Secret is a letter that’s not meant to be readMy darling Cecilia, if you’re reading this, then I’ve died...


Imagine that your husband wrote you a letter, to be opened after his death. Imagine, too, that the letter contains his deepest, darkest secret—something with the potential to destroy not just the life you built together, but the lives of others as well. Imagine, then, that you stumble across that letter while your husband is still very much alive. . . .
Cecilia Fitzpatrick has achieved it all—she’s an incredibly successful businesswoman, a pillar of her small community, and a devoted wife and mother. Her life is as orderly and spotless as her home. But that letter is about to change everything, and not just for her: Rachel and Tess barely know Cecilia—or each other—but they too are about to feel the earth-shattering repercussions of her husband’s secret.

Acclaimed author Liane Moriarty has written a gripping, thought-provoking novel about how well it is really possible to know our spouses—and, ultimately, ourselves.

I was skeptical about this book, I thought it was a good idea but when I stated to read it took a while to get to the actual secret. I was anxious and I wanted to know what he did. But once the secret was revealed the book took off. It really shows how something that happened decades ago can come back to hunt you, and completely change your life in a matter of seconds. This book was great, not my favorite but it was really good and a fast read. Simple and to the point. It touches on relationships, love, friendship, family, murder, forgiveness and life. It has a little bit of everything while still sticking to the main story. I think anyone can relate to at least one of the characters in the book.
The story follows 3 families, at first the families don't have anything in common, but as the books continues we learn just how much they are all connected. And how each of their actions affects the people around them. Sort of like the movie The Butterfly Effect, everything we do has consequences and sometimes those consequences trigger other actions that affect other people.
While reading the book I pretty much guessed everything that was going to happen, you can say it's predictable, but I still enjoyed reading it. I was actually prompted enough to look up some things about the Berlin Wall. The author uses a nice way to connect a historical event like taking down the Wall with what the characters are going though. Like the Wall that came down and feed the people, so does getting the truth out there and freeing your soul.

The Ultimate Gift by Jim Stovall

I really don't know what to make of this book, it wasn't bad by any means, it was super easy to read, and fast paced, usually what I like, but this was a little too good to be true. I know Jim Stovall is a motivational speaker and this book is supposed to teach us how life itself is a gift from God. But it's just a little too cheesy. And too predictable, we know whats going to happen from the first page. Plus the quote on the cover kind of gives it away, well I guess it's not a mystery book so who cares.
 
Uncle Red dies, the whole family gathers at the lawyers office to collect their inheritance, he leaves money for all his family members, except his great nephew Jason. Even from beyond the grave he wants to teach this little punk a lesson on life, because all he's ever done is spend money and not appreciate where it comes from (like the rest of his family, so I don't understand why he only focuses on this kid). So he makes him do certain things each month for a year and then he can receive his Ultimate Gift, which Jason believes, or hopes is a big sum of money. Each month he is supposed to learn something about life, each of those lessons are called gifts. So Jason not realizing what exactly his uncle had in mind, but still thinking of the money, agrees to this little game. He has to meet up with the lawyer and watch a video that his great uncle recorded, then do as he instructs and than report back to the lawyer. Each month. But as you can guess by the end he is a changed person who no longer cares for the material things, but cares about people and life. I don't believe it, you can't change a person that much in one year. This book is too imaginary. It's a story that you would hear from a visiting speaker at your High School. They are good lessons to learn, but I just don't believe in reading fiction to fix your life. If you're trying to be motivational I think you should give examples from real people. 
 
I guess people have liked it and will like it, but it just wasn't for me.  It's short enough though that I don't feel like I wasted my time, and I guess I would recommend it to some since it is a very fast paced book. And I hear there's a movie?

Much Ado About Loving by Jack Murnighan and Maura Kelly

I won this book on Goodreads.com giveaway and I enjoyed reading it. Although I'm skipping the chapters about books I haven't read yet, I don't want them ruining the books for me before I read them. But the ones that I did read have some funny advice and look a little deeper at the characters of the books.

This book goes further into the main character of a book to try and teach the reader about love. And how either under different circumstances or in reality most love stories wouldn't work out. And that we shouldn't base our love lives according to books. There's no perfect prince charming that's going to ride in on a white horse. I think it's a great way for readers to get a different perspective on their favorite books.  It's a great book for people still looking for love, on the other hand if you are in a relationship like I am, this book might just have you second guessing you loved one. And sometimes that's just not a good thing.